Kitchen Tip: How to Freeze Cookie Dough

From here.

Directions:

1. Roll the entire batch of cookie dough into balls just like you would if you were baking them.

2. Fill a baking pan or tray (here I’ve used a 9x13 non-stick baking pan) with all the rolled cookie dough balls, leaving just enough space between the cookie dough balls that they don’t get stuck together.

3. Stick the filled pan in the freezer. You don’t need to cover it, but make sure to keep it flat so the balls don’t move around and get stuck together.

4. Freeze until the cookie dough balls are hard. Meanwhile, take a gallon sized zip top freezer bag and label it with the recipe name, date, cooking temperature and time details.

5. Remove the pan from the freezer. Take all of the cookie dough balls out of the pan and place them in the labeled bag.

6. After filling, lay the bag flat (flat takes up less space). Remove as much air as possible. I like to zip the bag almost all the way and then stick a straw in the bag to suck out the excess air before I finish zipping it.

7. Stash the cookies in the freezer for later!

8. When I go to bake the frozen cookies I usually only thaw the cookies while the oven is preheating. I just let them bake about 2 minutes longer than the original recipe states.


» posted by samsinspiration
2 years ago on 22 September 2011 @ 6:28pm 1 note

More baking tips!

All from here.

 

  • *When making cakes, it’s important to beat the butter (at room temperature) with the sugar before adding everything else. When they’re creamed, the cakes turn out more airy and light. They say you should also add the eggs, one by one, and then everything else in small parts, but I don’t always follow that rule. Just make sure the butter and sugar is creamed first!

  • *For chewy cookies, add melted butter. For thin cookies, add more sugar. If you want cake-like cookies, add more eggs.

Read More

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 14 August 2011 @ 12:41pm 3 notes

How to make vanilla whipped cream!

Recipe here.

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 12 August 2011 @ 4:35am 4 notes

More baking tips!

All from here!

  •  To get the most juice from your citrus fruit, roll it around in your palm on a flat, hard surface for a few seconds. Then, heat the fruit in a microwave for 10 seconds. Slice in half and juice either by hand or with a juicing tool.
  •  If, while cracking eggs, you drop a piece of egg shell, scoop it out with half of the broken shell.
  • Don’t rinse berries before you store them in the fridge; the introduction of moisture encourages mold growth. Store them dry and rinse just before eating.
  • Most recipes call for unsalted butter because the salt content in manufactured butter varies from brand to brand. If you don’t have unsalted butter, use salted and reduce the amount of salt in the recipe.
  •  To make 1 cup of buttermilk, just combine 1 cup of milk with 1 tbsp. white vinegar or lemon juice. Let stand for five minutes. Voila, you have buttermilk to use in your next recipe!
  •  To write a message on top of a cake, first write the words in the frosting with a toothpick. Then, with a piping bag full of colorful frosting, trace over the words.
» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 11 August 2011 @ 7:27pm 7 notes

Extract tips:

There are many different flavored extracts out there at the market. I don’t use a lot of the extracts, because they give a fake flavor to your dessert. I LOVE vanilla extract. Pure is best, but use what you can afford. Almond is probably the second most used extract. I think using a little bit is okay, but if you use a lot, it will overwhelm your dessert. I also like to use peppermint extract for mint flavored goods and Christmas items. Coconut extract is good also.

Tip from here - click!

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 11 August 2011 @ 1:20pm

The best birthday cake yet; and tips for layering cakes! Very useful.

Recipe and tips here.

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 11 August 2011 @ 2:11am 2 notes

Butter, Oil, and Shortening tips:

I almost always use unsalted butter for my baking. Everything’s better with buttah! I occasionally use coconut oil and shortening for pie dough (coconut oil is solid at room temperature, so it works in pastry dough). You can use oil in desserts, usually cakes and cookies. A neutral flavored oil is preferred, such as vegetable.
I don’t usually use fat replacers, but some things that can take the place of fat, and make your desserts moist, are, applesauce, dates, juices, yogurt, low fat cream and ricotta cheese, low fat sour cream and buttermilk.
Peanut butter can take the place of butter in a baked good, but it’s not low fat! And it will be peanut flavored, of course.

Tip from here - click!

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 10 August 2011 @ 5:30pm

Sugar tip:

I use all sugars for baking. I like to use granulated sugar, light brown sugar, dark brown sugar (more molasses), turbinado sugar (coarse) and confectioners’ sugar. I like to bake with honey, as well, and occasionally corn syrup (for pecan pie!). Maple syrup is wonderful to use, any time of the year, but I love it in the fall and winter months! I sometimes use molasses, but it’s rare. It’s nice to use for spicy cookies and cakes.

Tip from here - click!

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 10 August 2011 @ 8:44am

Recipes and Mish Mash of Kitchen Wiz: BAKING SMARTS: TIPS FOR MAKING THE PERFECT COOKIES, BARS, MUFFINS AND...

godofscrumprecipes:

BAKING SMARTS:

TIPS FOR MAKING THE PERFECT COOKIES, BARS, MUFFINS AND QUICK BREADS


I am a self-taught baker. I’ve been baking since I was 11 years old using a Toaster Oven. When I turned 14 years old I became decently good at baking (this means that the cookies and mini muffins I baked…

» posted by samsinspiration
» via  godofscrumprecipes   (originally  godofscrumprecipes)
3 years ago on 10 August 2011 @ 4:22am 18 notes

Chocolate tips:

 I’m not much of a chocolate snob. I live in an area where we don’t have access to “gourmet” chocolate. I love using Ghirardelli bittersweet chocolate and white chocolate. I also think Lindt is a very good brand to use. If you’re trying to save money, Hershey’s Dark isn’t too shabby. I rarely use milk chocolate, because it dries out too much.

Tip from here - click!

» posted by samsinspiration
3 years ago on 9 August 2011 @ 5:28pm 1 note